Côte de Sézanne Overview

Intro to Cote de Sezanne Champagne region

Côte de Sézanne is one of the five main grape-growing sub regions of Champagne. It is located southwest of the Côte des Blancs wine region. It is basically a continuation of the Cotes des Blancs with similar chalky soil, orientation, and, of course, a dominance of the Chardonnay grape. Logically, for some, it is considered as a subregion of the Côte des Blancs as it is located directly to the south of this region. However, it deserves specific analysis due to its large size and the fact that it stretches more than 13 miles from the main slope of the Côte des Blancs.

The Cote de Sezanne is fully composed of Autre Cru villages as it does not contain any Grand Cru villages or Premier Cru village-level vineyards. However, the terroir of this Champagne wine region still yields some great wines in the hands of the right producers, and there are some great growers of Champagnes from this region.

Another name for the Côte de Sézanne is “Sézannais”. The region takes its name from the biggest town of the area, Sézanne. The total vineyard area is 1,418 hectares or one-third of the Côte des Blancs.

Grape Varieties

Chardonnay

In the Côte de Sézanne, the white Chardonnay grape accounts for more than 75% of the plantings. Chardonnay is one of the three main grape varieties of the Champagne region. It is well suited to the chalky soils of the Côte de Sézanne. Many say that Chardonnay from the Côte de Sézanne is usually a bit riper-feeling than from Côte des Blancs. Plantings of Chardonnay are steadily increasing in the region, and the area is largely dominated by this same variety mostly due to the commercial success of the Blanc de Blancs style of Champagne.

Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier in Cote de Sezanne

Pinot noir (18% of vineyard area) and Pinot meunier (5% of vineyard area) do exist in the sub region, but they are less well known in this area compared to the other four of the five sub regions. Some people say that the freshness same aging capacity

Cote de Sezanne Vineyards

Soil

The soil of the Côte de Sézanne shares some of its characteristics with the pure chalky soil of the Côte des Blancs. While the clay is not as pure and is often mixed with clay, it can still increase the quality of the grapes. Chalk is great at retaining the necessary water after the rains to properly sustain the vines, while at the same time showing incredible drainage abilities! This results in vines that are not overly vigorous despite the frequent rains in the region, allowing the grapes to ripen perfectly. 

Style

Blanc de Blancs

Chardonnay is increasing in popularity and the nearby Cote des Blancs is very well known for it, so lately more and more producers of the Côte de Sézanne plant more Chardonnay and produce Blanc de Blancs Champagne. Blanc de Blancs is a Champagne produced exclusively from white grapes, in the case of Champagne, this means mostly Chardonnay. Blanc de Blancs Champagne is not only famous for its elegant mouthfeel but also its long aging potential.

Producers in Cote de Sezanne

Champagne Pinard

http://champagne-pinard.com/

What better way to explore the particular identity of the wines of the Côte de Sézanne than to taste wines from a producer whose vineyards are located only in the municipality of the Sézanne itself. Champagne Pinard is an independent Champagne grower with sustainability certification. What’s more, part of their Chardonnay comes from old vines, so there is an intimate connection of the past with the future. The Blanc de Blancs is definitely worth a taste!

Champagne Vincent Léglantier 

http://champagne-leglantier.fr/champagnes-en.html

The Léglantier family is one of the oldest families of Saudoy, one of the villages of the Côte de Sézanne Champagne region. Vincent Léglantier, the current owner, focuses on retaining the tradition of producing gastronomic wines perfect to enjoy during a meal. They offer great roundness and elegance. You will find an excellent Blanc de Blancs Champagne, but the Millésime is probably the most iconic wine they produce, full of smooth tertiary aromas, like almond paste and butter, along with a soft fizz.